Friday, September 27, 2013

Roasted cauliflower


I am not a vegetarian. But I love vegetables.

It is late September, and the turning season is exciting. The produce at farmers markets is beginning to revolve, and cruciferous vegetables are arriving in the slow turn that will end in an infinity of apples, and tears by April.

At Borough Hall, this was such a beautiful cauliflower that I pounced on it, and then decided to keep it whole. It was our supper's main course (the side dish was broccoli with an anchovy and garlic dressing, if you're wondering).

It's hardly a recipe, but here goes.

1 head of cauliflower
Salt
Your favourite firm cheese (I used Emmenthaler)
Butter
Olive oil
Parmesan

Bring a large pot of water to a simmer on the stove and add a teaspoon of salt. When bubbles are rising in the hot water add the cauliflower, stem-end down. Cover and simmer for about ten minutes. Lift the lid, carefully grasp the cauliflower with tongs and turn over. Simmer another five minutes.

Heat the oven to 400'F/200'C.



Place the drained cauliflower in a large pan. Cut the cheese into slender batons and insert in about eight spots all around the cauliflower head. Rub a tablespoon of butter over the top, and drizzle a little olive oil over that. Season with salt and pepper.

Slide into the hot oven and roast until the top begins to brown, about 30 minutes.

Check on it once, basting the head with the melted butter and olive oil.

Remove from the oven, shower with a light cloud of microplaned parmesan, and serve at once, cut into big wedges.

2 comments:

  1. I'm not sure you will see this comment since it's a fairly old post (and with all the moving and unpacking, too) but I wanted to tell you my variation of your recipe. I had a head of cauliflower but no hard cheese. I did, however, have some gorgonzola, so I thought, why not. I also did not have as much time to roast it, so I followed the simmering in water bit, then separated the florets, tossed them in oil and butter and roasted them at 475 degrees for about 30 minutes. I upped the temp. to 500 the last 10 minutes in order to speed it up. When I took it out I tossed it with about 1/3 c. crumbled gorgonzola. Roquefort might be even better. The thing I've never liked about roasting cauliflower from its raw state is it always seems so dry. Boiling it ahead of the roasting made it moist and delicious. Thanks for the recipe.

    Nancy Mc

    ReplyDelete
  2. "shower with a cloud of microplaned" parmesan....love it ...

    ReplyDelete


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